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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
university press. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and the environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. , and it born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to get at some of the diversity of the taliban itself at the time when the united states was puzzling over the rejury gent as a movement and a political force in afghanistan. as a military challenge, and really a challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 defeat of the islamic member of the afghanistan. and which revived and presented itself as a grave d.a. lem that toment obama administration as it arrived in 2009. our effort to cowhat think tanks do. provide ground for it an complexity and granularity about this phenomena. recognizing that the sort of clicheed image of one eyed -- and his band of the devoted and attractable fan net tack was inadequate and falsifying of the problem. so the purpose was not prosecute a particular view of the taliban but just to start to document some sections of the diversity. and some aspect
for smoking a cigarette. that's why the taliban were not that hard to overthrow in 2001, because the people of afghanistan turned against this barbaric code that the taliban were trying to impose. and this is, you know, in iraq and in afghanistan hardly two of the most liberal, cosmopolitan countries in the world. today i suspect you're seeing much the same thing happen in northern mali where the islamists have tried to impose a very brutal code, and i suspect it's not proving very popular. however, the reason why these groups can have end during appeal is because there's not a good alternative. and the problem that we faced, for example, in afghanistan is that brutal and unpopular as the taliban are, the government has often been worse because the government has not delivered any kind of justice. what the government delivers is a decision that goes to the highest bidder. and so that bad as the taliban y be, they're less corrupt. and you will get a more or less honest judgment out of them which will then be enforced with barbaric severity. that's not the ideal that people want, but it may b
't out in the service but what suicide bombers and the taliban are doing with the extreme understanding of the suny they also target the shia. that is appalling and a complete breakdown no government can allow that but it happens. iran has a strong shi'ah power with interests in the region. that balance has to be careful if you have an understanding it can ease the tension. >> host: molly is emerging as a battleground. >> guest: read the book it has the same paradigm just like these tribesmen, they have been marginalized resources stolen, retreated as other great citizens on their own traditional way and. there comes a point* they say even if it is enough to be killed and raped and tortured. they react it is not very civilized or educated part of the world. the only act is the primary goal to kill people with their response and then the cycle begins again. so if you can help resolve that the philippines have taken an initiative to reach out to the tribal groups they simply negotiated autonomy, preserve culture? find. we have no objection but that simple initiative, then human act and th
by people that said they would be executed for smoking a cigarette. that's where the taliban were not hard to overthrow in 2001 because the people of afghanistan turned against this code the taliban were trying to impose and this is in iraq and afghanistan hardly the most cosmopolitan countries in the world. today i suspect you see much the same thing happened where they tried to impose a very brutal quote and i suspect it's not proving very popular. however, the reason these groups can have the appeal is because there's not a good alternative, and the problem that we face for example in afghanistan is that brutal and unpopular as they are the government has often been worse because the government hasn't delivered any kind of justice. what the government delivers is a decision that goes to the highest bid so as bad as the taliban maybe they are less corrupt and you won't get a more or less honest judgment out of them that will then be enforced to the barbaric severity. that's not the ideal people want but it may be better than the alternative and so i think the challenge we face in the cou
and the taliban are doing, because of their very extreme understanding of sunni islam, they're also targeting the shia. for example in pakistan, where i was commissioner, they killed 100 shia. that's appalling. a complete breakdown of law and order. no government can allow that and yet it happens. iran is a very strong, aggressive, shia power and it has interests in the region. so, again, it's on great game. balance has to be kept. so if you have an understanding in terms of the region, i think it can share. >> host: the country al -- of mali is entering. >> guest: you have being hearing about the tribes. they have been marginalized their lands robbed, million raleigh sources storm, really treated as third rate citizens on their own land by their central government. so their there comes a point when they say, enough is enough, we're going to react, and they react. unfortunately this is not a very civilized or very educated part of the world. these are tribesmen. most of them are illiterate. they only act according to their open tribal codes and the primary code is the law of revenge so they g
overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and then got out of there. of course, afghanistan fell apart and we had go back. anorak it's falling apart very, very quickly. we are facing an insurgency, we don't know what to do. like nagl, all the officers who were there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. they do know what to do so they did what they usually do. which was to bang down doors and arrest and kill people, which is anybody who would read nagl what is known is counterproductive because you wind up killing the wrong people. you inflame, you this off their brother and their cousins and they become insurgents, too. so the insurgents is going. meanwhile, petraeus upend mosul besides to put into effect the ideas of these books he's been reading. so he and his guys, they start setting up elections for the new district council. they set up the elections. they bring in fuel trucks from turkey. they read open the university. they get to mutation systems going. they get some iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens up the border to syria along northern iraq. it is all this on his own. he's
organization. it belongs to no state. attacking states, laying low state government, defeating the taliban, al qaeda, making war in it will not stop it because terrorism like steanlt like markets are independenter in their character. what we have created beginning of the 21st century is a deep symmetry between the challenges we face and the political response the political institutions we have to respond to that. every challenge is interdependent global cross frontier and the primary political actors that respond are bounded, frontiered, independent nation states. and in that a symmetry, you can see the dysfunction of the modern world. we watch, for example, starting four or five years ago in copenhagen and going through mexico city and due by and recent meetings where 180 or 190 nations came together to renew the protocol already out of date in term of the ecological challenges but to embrace that now and failing to do so. and going home and saying that is because our sovereignty said china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to intern
. it was deliberate because the plan was overthrow saddam and get out. just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and then got out of there and of course afghanistan fell apart. i and iraq is falling apart very quickly. we are facing an insurgency we don't know what to do with like all the officers who are there have not been trained to fight this sort of war. it was not in the manuals and they didn't know what to do so they do what they usually do which was to bang down doors and arrest people. anyone who has read kahlÚa would have known as counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people and you inflame -- you make them mad so the insurgents is flaming and meanwhile petraeus in mosul decides to put into effect the ideas in these books he has been reading. he and his guys start setting up an election for the new district. they vet the candidates candidatecandidate s and they said that the elections. they bring in fuel trucks. they reopened the university. they get communication systems going. they get some iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens up the border to syria
not for afghans. they didn't invite in 2001. it meant our goal to get rid of al qaeda. when we upped the taliban government and set the country in to free play, i think we developed a responsibility for helping them set it right. third, i think in america and the world's interest to have a stability region. if afghanistan were to be completely unstable, i think pakistan's stability would be very tenuous. and they have challenges anyway. i think it's important. so my view what we need to do is be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are nervous because in 2004, they think we're going leave and they have seen us leave before. in 1989 we turned from the region. it doesn't matter which each individual afghan saw that. it's become commonly accepted truth we left in 19 the 9 ab and they're walk in 2014. and they'll be nobody they can rely on. they don't have other strategic allies. what they're looking for, in my view, the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that's a specific number of troops in a specific amount of money. ink it's the idea you
to get rid of al qaeda. but we appended the taliban government and set the country in the free plate i think we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them set it right. third dimaggio's strategically at think it is in america and the world's interest to have a stable region. if america were to be completely unstable i think that pakistan stability would be very tenuous and they have challenges in the way, but i think it is important so my view is what we need to do is be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are so nervous is because in 2004 they think we're going to leave, and they have seen it happen before. in 1989 returned from the region. the intimate does not matter whether each individual afghan saw that, it has become commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989, and they're starting to think we're just going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody that they can rely on. they do not have other judges to catalyze. so what they're looking for in my view is the idea of all long-term should jiji partnership. i don't think that is
in the justice department to make membership in al qaeda or the taliban itself a crime. but that was rejected because they thought the idea of mia membership as a crime was seen as it had very bad optics, one senior official in the pentagon told me it sounds like having a fought crime from 1984. that would be a problem. theythought crime from 1984. that would be a problem. they did decide to import conspiracy and civilian law to military law. it is easy to prove as opposed to things they are conspiring to do more have done. for the same reason it has been disfavored as a war crime. the nuremberg tribunal rejected conspiracy conviction for the most part. the rationale is just that the nature of armed conflict is doing things in a group. since that is what the entire endeavour is, to unmask coordinated violence, making one participant guilty of the act of all the other participants would be too broad. that is the rationale. but what happened with the twenty-first century military commission project was several civilian crime such as conspiracy were imported into this military code but it raise
the medicine 2001. we met our goal to get rid of al qaeda. we have under the taliban government and set the country started into screenplay, we developed some more responsibility for helping him set a rate third, i think it's an america in the center a stable region. if afghanistan were completely unstable, who'd be very tenuous but it's important. we need to be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are so nervous is because in 2004 they think we're going to leave and 18 asleep before. in 1889, we turn from the region. it doesn't matter whether each individual afghans saw that, it's become commonly accepted truth they don't have other strategic allies. so what they're looking for in my view is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. but i think that's a specific number of troops, even a specific amount of money. their fear is they are very far away. i was asking him this question. i said what you want in the future years quite homage to see what here? said a word about business and i'll be here taking money. because if you're making money here
to us and said they were going to renounce themselves from the taliban. and this is how i believe we win the war, for what it's worth. i believe that by lowering the supporters of the taliban and by that and stopping their freedom of movement, we win the war and stop terrorism. so that's what we were trying to do on this mission. but almost immediately upon entering the village, my team was under attack. it was an ambush, and it was big. it didn't take me long to realize that it wasn't a normal ambush. i've been in quite a few fire fights by this time, but it's like at the first of any fire fight it's kind of like the dust comes in, you try to figure out any situation, the dust comes in, you figure it out, and then your training kicks in, and you just start doing your job after about 10 or 15 minutes. but not in this fight. it was like one thing after another started to fail us. and everything started to fall like a house of cards. everything that we relied on in every other fire fight to support us wasn't happening. it was like our mission was falling quickly like a house of cards. and
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)